Early twentieth-century view of Cypress Park and Lincoln Heights (then named East Los Angeles) from Elysian Park. On the left, a pre-channelization Los Angeles River flows in the foreground, while the Arroyo Seco is visible in the distance on the far right.

Early twentieth-century view of Cypress Park and Lincoln Heights (then named East Los Angeles) from Elysian Park. On the left, a pre-channelization Los Angeles River flows in the foreground, while the Arroyo Seco is visible in the distance on the far right.

Pasadena’s Colorado Street Bridge as it appeared in 1920. The bridge’s graceful Beaux Arts arches first crossed the Arroyo Seco in 1913. Rising 144 feet above the mostly dry ravine below, the bridge earned an unfortunate nickname — Suicide Bridge — after dozens of people leaped from the structure to their deaths during the Great Depression.
For more photos of historic L.A.-area bridges, see “A Brief History of Bridges in Los Angeles County,” L.A. as Subject’s latest KCET.org contribution.

Pasadena’s Colorado Street Bridge as it appeared in 1920. The bridge’s graceful Beaux Arts arches first crossed the Arroyo Seco in 1913. Rising 144 feet above the mostly dry ravine below, the bridge earned an unfortunate nickname — Suicide Bridge — after dozens of people leaped from the structure to their deaths during the Great Depression.

For more photos of historic L.A.-area bridges, see “A Brief History of Bridges in Los Angeles County,” L.A. as Subject’s latest KCET.org contribution.

Circa 1910 view of Arroyo Blvd in Pasadena. The present-day site of the Rose Bowl is visible in the distance.

Circa 1910 view of Arroyo Blvd in Pasadena. The present-day site of the Rose Bowl is visible in the distance.

Railway bridge across the Arroyo Seco between Garvanza and South Pasadena, circa 1895. In the background, a train crosses along the tracks of the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley Railroad.

Railway bridge across the Arroyo Seco between Garvanza and South Pasadena, circa 1895. In the background, a train crosses along the tracks of the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley Railroad.

Pasadena’s Colorado Street Bridge, which spans the Arroyo Seco, opened on this day in 1913. This aerial view shows the bridge as it was in 1935, before the construction of the 134 freeway. The Rose Bowl and San Gabriel Mountains are visible in the distance.

Pasadena’s Colorado Street Bridge, which spans the Arroyo Seco, opened on this day in 1913. This aerial view shows the bridge as it was in 1935, before the construction of the 134 freeway. The Rose Bowl and San Gabriel Mountains are visible in the distance.