1970 aerial view of downtown Los Angeles, showing the interchange of the Santa Monica and Harbor Freeways, the future site of the Los Angeles Convention Center and Farmers Field, and a mid-redevelopment Bunker Hill.
Part of the Dick Whittington Photograph Collection in the USC Digital Library.

1970 aerial view of downtown Los Angeles, showing the interchange of the Santa Monica and Harbor Freeways, the future site of the Los Angeles Convention Center and Farmers Field, and a mid-redevelopment Bunker Hill.

Part of the Dick Whittington Photograph Collection in the USC Digital Library.

Circa 1937 view of the Third Street Tunnel’s west portal between Hope and Flower streets, with the residential community of Bunker Hill perched above. As Eric Richardson notes in blogdowntown’s primer on the tunnel’s history, the tunnel was in 1967 extended 110 feet west of the portal seen here as part of the Bunker Hill redevelopment plan.
Part of the TICOR/Pierce Collection in the USC Digital Library.

Circa 1937 view of the Third Street Tunnel’s west portal between Hope and Flower streets, with the residential community of Bunker Hill perched above. As Eric Richardson notes in blogdowntown’s primer on the tunnel’s history, the tunnel was in 1967 extended 110 feet west of the portal seen here as part of the Bunker Hill redevelopment plan.

Part of the TICOR/Pierce Collection in the USC Digital Library.

Intersection of Third and Hill streets circa 1898, before the construction of the Third Street Tunnel or Angels Flight. The view looks northwest up Third Street at Bunker Hill and the Queen Anne Crocker Mansion at Third and Olive.

Intersection of Third and Hill streets circa 1898, before the construction of the Third Street Tunnel or Angels Flight. The view looks northwest up Third Street at Bunker Hill and the Queen Anne Crocker Mansion at Third and Olive.

Circa 1900 view of Bunker Hill, downtown L.A.’s lost neighborhood. The view looks west from the county courthouse atop Poundcake Hill. Broadway is visible in the bottom-left, and at the far right stands the Crocker mansion at the corner of Hill and Court streets.
In the 1950s and ’60s, a redevelopment project cleared Bunker Hill of its streets and buildings and altered the physical topography of the neighborhood. Learn more about Bunker Hill’s development and eventual demise with L.A. as Subject’s latest KCET contribution.

Circa 1900 view of Bunker Hill, downtown L.A.’s lost neighborhood. The view looks west from the county courthouse atop Poundcake Hill. Broadway is visible in the bottom-left, and at the far right stands the Crocker mansion at the corner of Hill and Court streets.

In the 1950s and ’60s, a redevelopment project cleared Bunker Hill of its streets and buildings and altered the physical topography of the neighborhood. Learn more about Bunker Hill’s development and eventual demise with L.A. as Subject’s latest KCET contribution.

View of Spring Street in downtown Los Angeles, looking south from the top of the Temple Block, circa 1876. The vantage point is roughly from the current site of City Hall, and most of the land in the foreground is now occupied by City Hall’s south lawn. (Spring Street has since been realigned north of First Street.) To the right, a mostly undeveloped Bunker Hill stands at the site of the present-day Financial District. 

View of Spring Street in downtown Los Angeles, looking south from the top of the Temple Block, circa 1876. The vantage point is roughly from the current site of City Hall, and most of the land in the foreground is now occupied by City Hall’s south lawn. (Spring Street has since been realigned north of First Street.) To the right, a mostly undeveloped Bunker Hill stands at the site of the present-day Financial District.